Mark Dyck

Blog

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blog

 

The blog is my Whole Self Home Base,
where all the aspects of my life come together through my writing.

It’s like a bread recipe - bring a wide variety of ingredients together and create something way better than the individual parts.

You’ll find riffs on community and connection, musings on baking and fermentation, reflections on travel experiences and much more.

 
 

 
 

Money Flows

Photo by    Jon Flobrant    on    Unsplash
 

We were chatting over at the Right Company about our relationship with money, when my friend David dropped a line that had my eyes bugging out.

He was brought up with the idea that “money flows.” It comes in, it goes out. That’s the nature of life. While you have it, use it.

Money Flows
— J. David Stein

I must say, that’s a better way of looking at money than mine, as taught to me by my parents and grandparents. Our attitude had a longer name. Something like “money rarely comes in and it goes out faster than you want and you’re certainly going to run out and then what will people say about us so worry, worry, worry all the time!”

Cindy’s worked hard on me over the years to adjust my attitude, but still, David’s idea floored me.

Money comes in. Money goes out. That’s the way of the world.

A few weeks back, when I was out in Montreal for the fierce and vital A Taste For Grain happening, I had one of the best meals ever - a five course meal, crafted by five chefs, all featuring local grains in some manner. From a salad with oats to a buckwheat pasta to levain marinated chicken to levain infused ice cream.

I knew it was going to be a pricey meal, but I hadn’t taken into account the wine flight that accompanied each course. By the time I got the bill, it was easily the most expensive meal I’ve had in my life. Heck, more than double the next most expensive meal.

Thank goodness for David. An earlier incarnation of Mark would’ve fretted for the rest of the trip, trying to live off saltine crackers and raw carrots to make up for my extravagant meal.

Instead, I smiled, paid the bill, and walked back to my apartment with a smile on my face. Every block or so, I’d laugh to myself and say “Money flows. Money flows…”

And you know what, it did. I baked more bread, paid my credit card and moved on. And I’ve eaten well since. (Maybe not as well as at Restaurant Manitoba, but well.)

Thanks, David. It helped.